Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

From fishers to farmers: Assessing aquaculture adoption in a training program for commercial fishers

Buy Article:

$17.00 + tax (Refund Policy)

Coastal communities in Maine are highly dependent on marine resources, especially the American lobster, Homarus americanus H. Milne-Edwards, 1837, fishery. Overreliance on a single species poses a precarious socioeconomic situation for these communities. Shellfish and seaweed aquaculture is viewed as a diversification strategy for fishers; however, the adoption of aquaculture by Maine fishers is understudied. The Aquaculture in Shared Waters program trains commercial fishers in shellfish and seaweed aquaculture, and provides an opportunity to understand the types of commercial fishers who are considering adoption. Here, we summarize initial findings from an ongoing longitudinal study of training program participants that aims to understand the process of integrating fishing and farming. We utilized participant observations, semi-structured interviews, and structured surveys to gather data on individual characteristics, motivations for considering aquaculture, and perceptions of barriers to the adoption of aquaculture. Most fishers report being interested in aquaculture as a diversification strategy and are most concerned about aspects of running an aquaculture operation. They report less concern about environmental uncertainty, the regulatory process, and community relations. Initial findings will guide future inquiry with commercial fishers about aquaculture integration, as well as provide practitioners with additional information to tailor future training.
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Ecology & Environmental Sciences Graduate Program, University of Maine, 101 Nutting Hall, Orono, Maine 04469, Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network, Maine EPSCoR at the University of Maine, 5717 Corbett Hall, Room 444, Orono, Maine 04469-5717;, Email: [email protected] 2: Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network, Maine EPSCoR at the University of Maine, 5717 Corbett Hall, Room 444, Orono, Maine 04469-5717, School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, 200 Libby Hall, Orono, Maine 04469-5706 3: Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network, Maine EPSCoR at the University of Maine, 5717 Corbett Hall, Room 444, Orono, Maine 04469-5717, Department of Anthropology, University of Maine, 5773 S. Stevens Hall, Orono, Maine 04469-5773 4: School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, 200 Libby Hall, Orono, Maine 04469-5706

Publication date: 01 July 2018

This article was made available online on 13 June 2018 as a Fast Track article with title: "From fishers to farmers: Assessing aquaculture adoption in a training program for commercial fishers".

More about this publication?
  • The Bulletin of Marine Science is dedicated to the dissemination of high quality research from the world's oceans. All aspects of marine science are treated by the Bulletin of Marine Science, including papers in marine biology, biological oceanography, fisheries, marine affairs, applied marine physics, marine geology and geophysics, marine and atmospheric chemistry, and meteorology and physical oceanography.
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more