Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Changes in Perceived Threats of Shame, Embarrassment, and Legal Sanctions for Interpersonal Violence, 1982-1992

Buy Article:

$24.00 + tax (Refund Policy)

A survey conducted in 1982 measured perceived threats of shame, embarrassment, and legal sanctions for "physically hurting someone on purpose" among a sample of adults in a southwestern city (N = 350). Sampling from the same community and using an identical methodology, the measures were repeated in a 1992 survey (N = 396). The growing social condemnation of interpersonal violence, especially intimate violence, during the decade and the increasingly punitive response to it by the legal system lead to the hypothesis that perceived threats of shame, embarrassment, and legal sanctions for this behavior were higher in 1992 than they were in 1982. Results indicate increases for embarrassment and legal sanctions among some segments of the population and are discussed in the context of previous findings concerning shame, embarrassment, and legal sanctions as deterrents.
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Journal Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Sociology, University of Oklahoma, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Social Control 2: Department of Sociology University of Oklahoma Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Social Control

Publication date: January 1, 1993

More about this publication?
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more