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Content loaded within last 14 days Kindergarten Entry Age and Household Food Insecurity

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Objective: In this paper, we examine the effects of school entry age, presenting empirical evidence on the food insecurity aspect of the problem. Methods: We used 2 nationally representative samples of US children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K) and 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011), allowing for cross-cohort comparisons. The 2 data sets both include detailed information on food security conditions. The ECLS-K focuses on children's educational experiences from kindergarten through the 8th grade while the ECLS-K:2011 follows children from kindergarten through the 5th grade. Results: We found no statistically significant relationship between kindergarten entry age and food insecurity in the overall sample in both cohorts of ECLS-K 1998-99 and 2010-11. Sub-group analyses suggest that children from low-income households entering kindergarten at a later age are significantly less likely to have household food security in the 2010-11 cohort. Conclusion: The rising financial pressure in modern society makes it harder for low-income families if children have to delay kindergarten entry.
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Keywords: CHILD NUTRITION; CHILDCARE; FOOD INSECURITY; KINDERGARTEN; KINDERGARTEN ENTRY AGE

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: October 1, 2020

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  • Health Behavior and Policy Review is a rigorously peer-reviewed scholarly bi-monthly publication that seeks manuscripts on health behavior or policy topics that represent original research, including papers that examine the development, advocacy, implementation, or evaluation of policies around specific health issues. The Review especially welcomes papers that tie together health behavior and policy recommendations. Articles are available through subscription or can be ordered individually from the Health Behavior and Policy Review site.
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