Skip to main content

Effectiveness of Intuitive Eating Intervention through Text Messaging among College Students

Buy Article:

$24.00 + tax (Refund Policy)

This study examined the effects of an intuitive eating (IE) text messaging intervention on the IE habits, perceived stress, and perceived self-efficacy of college students in comparison to an electronically emailed handout with the same information. Undergraduate students at a Midwestern university (n=300) completed a pre-intervention survey online which assessed IE practice (Intuitive Eating Scale), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), and self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale and Eating Habits Confidence Survey). Participants were randomly divided into a control (n=150) and intervention (n=150) group. The intervention group received five weeks of intervention with weekly IE texts, and the control received the same IE information in one emailed handout. Following the intervention, all participants completed the post-intervention survey with the same measures. A total of 146 (n = 99 intervention, n = 47 control) participants completed the pre-and post-intervention surveys. Paired t-tests and linear regressions were used for analyses. The results showed the IE texting intervention significantly increased total IE habits. Additionally, IE texting was found to increase GSE scores and to limit increases in PSS levels. The results of this study provide evidence that texting can be a successful platform for increasing IE behaviors among college students.

Keywords: INTUITIVE EATING; MINDFUL EATING; NUTRITION; PERCEIVED STRESS; SELF-EFFICACY; TEXTING INTERVENTION

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: June 1, 2018

More about this publication?
  • College Student Journal publishes original investigations and theoretical papers dealing with college student values, attitudes, opinions, and learning. Topics include the areas of undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools, and may also include selected contributions dealing with college preparation.

  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content