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Moderation by Neighborhood Food Outlets on Relationships between Meal Sources and Diet

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Objectives: In this study, we tested for moderation by neighborhood food outlet presence on relationships between food outlet shopping or meal sources and dietary intake. Methods: We used generalized linear models to analyze parent-adolescent (12-17 years) dyad data from the 2014 Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health and Eating. Questions included food outlet presence in home (parent) and school (adolescent) neighborhoods (yes or no), shopping at food outlets (parent) (never, rarely, sometimes, often or always), and sources of food consumed away from and at home (weekly frequency). We captured food and beverage intakes via a dietary screener. Results: Relationships between adolescent added sugar intake and scratch cooked evening meals and meals away from home were found only when grocery stores and fast food restaurants, respectively, were present in adolescents' school neighborhoods. Shopping at fruit and vegetable (FV) markets and scratch cooked evening meals were associated with the largest increases in parent and adolescent FV intakes, respectively. Meals away from home at convenience stores were associated with the largest increases in parent and adolescent intakes of added sugars. Conclusions: Neighborhood grocery store and fast food restaurant presence moderated relationships between meal sources and dietary intake only in adolescents.
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Keywords: ADOLESCENT DIETS; FOOD ENVIRONMENT; FOOD OUTLET SHOPPING; MEAL SOURCES; PARENT-ADOLESCENT DYADS

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Jessica L. Thomson, Research Epidemiologists, Delta Human Nutrition Research Program, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, United States; ; [email protected], Email: [email protected] 2: Alicia S. Landry, Associate Professor, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR, United States 3: Tameka I. Walls, Research Epidemiologists, Delta Human Nutrition Research Program, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, United States 4: Melissa H. Goodman, Research Epidemiologists, Delta Human Nutrition Research Program, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, United States

Publication date: March 1, 2021

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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