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Relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Gambling in Nevada

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Objectives: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with lasting health and behavioral effects. In this study, we assess the relationship between ACEs and gambling in the state of Nevada. Methods: Using 2018 Nevada Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data, we assessed the relationship between ACEs and gambling behavior among 2768 participants. A composite score was used to assess 10 commonly researched ACEs; this continuous score was additionally categorized into 0 ACEs, 1-2 ACEs, 3 or more ACEs. We used weighted logistic regression to assess the relationship between ACEs scores and frequency of gambling. Results: Approximately 9% of study participants reported frequently gambling (one or more times a month). There was a positive association between the continuous ACEs score and frequently gambling in the fully adjusted model (p = .026). The odds of frequently gambling was 69% higher among those exposed to ≥ 3 ACEs compared to those who had no ACEs exposure (adjusted OR = 1.69; 95% CI 1.00-2.84; p = .048). Conclusions: The results show a relationship between ACEs and gambling in Nevada. This research contributes to the existing understanding of ACEs and their impact.
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Keywords: ACES; ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES; GAMBLING; NEVADA GAMING; RISKY BEHAVIORS

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Winter Tucker, student, Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, United States 2: Joshua V. Garn, Assistant Professor, Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, United States;, Email: [email protected] 3: Wei Yang, Professor, Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Environmental Health, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, United States;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: March 1, 2021

More about this publication?
  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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