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Impact of Menopause and Body Composition Status on Dyslipidemia in Women

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Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the effects of menopausal and body composition statuses on measures of total and regional body composition and dyslipidemia in women. Methods: Sedentary, non-smoking women (N = 212), not currently treated for dyslipidemia were grouped based on 2 categories: (1) menstrual status: premenopausal or postmenopausal and (2) body composition status: normal weight (NW; BMI < 25 kg/m2 and body fat (BF) < 36%), normal weight obese (NWO; BMI < 25 kg/m2 and BF > 36%), or obese (BMI > 25 kg/m2 and BF > 36%), to determine differences in total and regional body composition and measures of lipid and lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations. Results: Overall, a greater prevalence of NWO was observed in postmenopausal versus premenopausal women. Being postmenopausal was associated with higher TC, LDL-C, non-HDL-C, HDL-C, and HDL3-C. Premenopausal NWO women had elevated LDL-C and VLDL-C comparable to obese women. Postmenopausal NWO women had elevated Tg and VLDL-C and lower HDL-C similar to obese women. Conclusions: Menopausal status was not associated with differences in fat distribution, however, the age-related differences in lipids and lipoproteins appear to be due to a difference in menopausal status exacerbated in women who are NWO.
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Keywords: BODY COMPOSITION DISTRIBUTION; DYSLIPIDEMIA; MENOPAUSAL STATUS; NORMAL WEIGHT OBESITY

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Joshua S. Wooten, Associate Professor, Department of Applied Health, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, United States;, Email: [email protected] 2: Benjamin L. Webb, Associate Professor, Department of Applied Health, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, United States 3: Nancy M. DiMarco, Professor Emerita, Nutrition and Food Sciences, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX, United States 4: David L. Nichols, Professor, School of Health Promotion and Kinesiology, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX, United States 5: Charlotte F. Sanborn, Professor Emerita, School of Health Promotion and Kinesiology, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX, United States

Publication date: January 1, 2021

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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