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Empowering Native Adolescents: Responsibility for Their Health Behaviors

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Objectives: In this study, we assess the impact of a home-based diabetes prevention program, Together on Diabetes (TOD), on adolescent responsibility-taking for tasks related to diabetes risk. Methods: Participants were Native American youth ages 10-19 with or at risk of type 2 diabetes who participated in a 12-session, 6-month diabetes prevention program with an adult caretaker. Assessments completed at baseline, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up include demographics and the Diabetes and Obesity Task Sharing (DOTS) Questionnaire. We used latent class analysis (LCA) at baseline to examine heterogeneity in DOTS responses. We identified 3 classes (adolescent, shared, caretaker). We used latent transition analysis to examine stability and change in latent status at baseline, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Results: At baseline, the mean age of participants was 13.6 years and 55.9% were boys. From baseline to 6-month follow-up, the adolescent class was most stable, whereas the shared and caretaker classes were less stable. For participants who transition from the adolescent class, most transition to shared class compared to caretaker class. Conclusions: TOD helps to empower Native American adolescents to take responsibility for their health and engage with their caregivers in these decisions.
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Keywords: ADOLESCENT HEALTH; DIABETES; HEALTH PROMOTION; NATIVE AMERICANS; OBESITY

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Rachel Chambers, Senior Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States;, Email: [email protected] 2: Dane Hautala, Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Duluth, MN, United States 3: Anne Kenney, Senior Research Associate Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States 4: Summer Rosenstock, Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States 5: Marissa Begay, Research Program Assistant, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Chinle, AZ, United States 6: Nicole Neault, Senior Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Albuquerque, NM, United States 7: Raymond Reid, Senior Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Shiprock, NM, United States 8: Jennifer Richards, Assistant Scientist, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Tuba City, AZ, United States 9: Novalene Goklish, Research Associate Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Whiteriver, AZ, United States 10: Van De Mheen, Professor, Tilburg University, Scientific Centre for Care and Welfare (Tranzo), Tilburg, The Netherlands 11: Allison Barlow, Director, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States 12: Melissa Walls, Director of Great Lakes Hub, Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Duluth, MN, United States

Publication date: January 1, 2021

More about this publication?
  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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