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Open Access A Modified Nominal Group Technique (mNGT) – Finding Priorities in Research

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Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe a modified nominal group technique (mNGT) approach to assess community health priorities and its application to a childhood obesity prevention project conducted with the high school population. Methods: This manuscript provides detailed information of a mNGT separately conducted with 3 cohorts, (students, teachers/administration, parents). Participants used a response sheet to brainstorm, document top 5 responses, and rank each response individually. We also used a unique reverse scoring method to quantify the qualitative data and within and between group scores for comparison against other cohorts. Summaries provided additional insight into the participants' perceptions. Results: The mNGT process successfully reduced limitations common to the traditional nominal group technique by providing an in-depth understanding of perceptions and understanding priorities. Conclusions: mNGT can be useful across other disciplines as a method of gathering rich qualitative feedback that can be transformed into a more quantitative form for analysis.
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Keywords: DISSEMINATION; HEALTH PRIORITIES; NOMINAL GROUP TECHNIQUE; PROTOCOL; YOUTH

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Sa'Nealdra T. Wiggins, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Nutrition, The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 2: Sarah Colby, Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition, The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN;, Email: [email protected] 3: Lauren Moret, Independent Evaluator, Atlanta, GA 4: Marissa McElrone, Graduate Student, Department of Nutrition, The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 5: Melissa D. Olfert, Associate Professor, Department of Human Nutrition and Foods, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 6: Kristin Riggsbee, Visiting Lecturer of Health Promotion, Division of Health Sciences and Outdoor Studies, Maryville College, Maryville, TN 7: Audrey Opoku-Acheampong, Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics, and Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8: Tandalayo Kidd, Professor and Associate Department Head, Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics, and Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

Publication date: May 1, 2020

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

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