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Content loaded within last 14 days Differential Use of Strategic Constructs of the Transtheoretical Model across Accelerometer-determined Sedentary Time

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Objectives: In this study, we investigated the differences in strategic constructs of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) across accelerometer-determined sedentary time. Methods: A total of 201 college students participated in a TTM questionnaire for sedentary behavior and wore an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to assess sedentary time. Multivariate analyses of variances (MANOVA) with post hoc pairwise comparisons were conducted to determine mean differences in the strategic constructs across quintiles of sedentary time. Tests for linear trends were conducted using orthogonal polynomial coefficients. Results: Compared with participants in higher quintiles of sitting time, 8 out of 10 processes of change (eg, mostly consciousness raising [η2 p = .09]) were used significantly more frequently by those in the lowest quintile (p < .05) with negative linear trends (ptrend < .05). We found no statistically significant differences in the constructs of self-efficacy and decisional balance across the quintiles. Conclusions: Based on this preliminary analysis it appears that several intervention methods such as awareness raising, incentivization, self-motivation, and social norm building would be more beneficial to reduce sitting time or to protect their current sitting time from relapse.
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Keywords: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY; PROCESSES OF CHANGE; SITTING

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Post-doctoral Research Associate, School of Applied Sciences, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 2: Professor, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Austin, TX and Department of Kinesiology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 3: Associate Professor, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Austin, TX and Department of Kinesiology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 4: Assistant Professor, School of Community Health Sciences, Counseling and Counseling Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: January 1, 2020

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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