Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Open Access Grit is Associated with Food Security among US Parents and Adolescents

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 245.6 kb)
 
Objectives: We investigated whether the Short Grit Scale (Grit-S) predicted odds of food insecurity (FI) among adults and their children. Methods: A cross-sectional panel of parent-child dyads completed an online questionnaire. Eligible dyads included parents with household income below the 2015 median ($52,250 USD/year) and their self-selected household child between the ages of 13 to 17 years. An online questionnaire assessed: (1) FI using the 18-item Household Food Security Survey Module and the Food Security Survey Module for Youth; (2) perseverance and determination using the validated 8-item Grit-S; and (3) sociodemographic FI predictors. Logit regression models estimated the relationship between odds of FI and predictors among parents and children, separately. Results: Among 252 parents, 61.1% reported household FI. Parents' Grit-S score (N = 179) was associated with a significantly lower odds of household FI (OR= 0.4; 95%CI= 0.2, 0.8; p < .01) while adjusting for established predictors. Mean (±SD) Grit-S was 3.1 (±0.7). Children's Grit-S score (N = 178) was associated with a significantly lower odds of child FI (OR= 0.6; 95%CI= 0.4, 0.9; p < .05) while adjusting for established predictors. Conclusions: Perseverance and determination, also known as "grit," may be one further explanation for why some poor households are food secure.
No References for this article.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: FOOD; FOOD SECURITY; GRIT; HUNGER; PERSEVERANCE

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Graduate Research Assistant, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Urbana, IL 2: Assistant Research Specialist, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 3: Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, Urbana, IL 4: Associate Professor, Purdue University, Department of Nutrition Science, West Lafayette, IN 5: Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, Urbana, IL 6: Professor and Department Head, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Urbana, IL;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: January 1, 2019

More about this publication?
  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Review Board
  • Reprints and Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more