Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Food Melt in Consumer Food Environments in Low-income Urban Neighborhoods

Buy Article:

$40.34 + tax (Refund Policy)

Objectives: We systematically evaluated changes in availability, price, and quality of perishable food items from the beginning to the end of the month in lowincome, urban neighborhoods. Methods: The sample included grocery stores or supermarkets in Cleveland, Ohio, within neighborhoods with >30% of population receiving food assistance. We collected data for 2 sequential months during the first and fourth weeks of each month. Two coders evaluated stores, collecting measures of availability, price, and quality for 50 items. We examined difference in number and proportion of items available at the beginning of the month (BOM) to items remaining available at the end of the month (EOM), as well as quality and price of those items. Results: Across 48 stores, availability at EOM was lower than BOM; as store size increased, reduction in availability (ie, food melt) was significantly (p < .01) less pronounced. Overall, items became less expensive at the EOM whereas quality remained consistent; we noted no statistically significant differences by store type for price or quality. Conclusions: Food melt differentially affects individuals in neighborhoods without grocery stores. Findings reveal composition of food environments is dynamic rather than static, influencing food-purchasing choices among lowincome consumers.
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: ACCESS; FOOD ENVIRONMENT; FOOD STORES; LOW-INCOME; SNAP; URBAN

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Assistant Professor, Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio;, Email: [email protected] 2: Research Associate, Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 3: Professor, Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 4: Associate Professor, Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 5: Assistant Professor, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 6: Department of Sociology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 7: Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Publication date: November 1, 2017

More about this publication?
  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Review Board
  • Reprints and Permissions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more