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Nut Intake among Overweight and Obese African-American Women in the Rural South

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Objective: Nut consumption decreases risk for obesity and chronic diseases, which are prevalent among African-American women in the rural southeastern United States. The quantity and quality of nut intake in this population is unclear. We examined the amount, source, and quality of nut consumption among overweight and obese African-American women in rural Alabama and Mississippi. Methods: Two 24-hour dietary recalls were administered to 426 women. Mann-Whitney tests, t-tests, and linear regression models identified differences in added sugar and sodium intake between nut consumers and non-consumers, differences in mean nut, added sugar, and sodium intake between stand-alone and incorporated nut sources, and a relationship between nut intake and added sugar and sodium intake. Results: Forty-two percent of participants consumed nuts, and 16% met federal recommendations for nut intake. Nut consumption was mainly from incorporated sources (65%), which were higher in added sugar (p < .001) and sodium (p < .001), and lower in nut quantity (p < .001) than stand-alone sources. Nut consumers consumed more daily added sugar (p = .004) and sodium (p = .04) than non-consumers. Conclusion: Suboptimal quantity and quality of nut intake may impede the health benefits of nut consumption among African-American women in the rural South.
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Keywords: NUTS; OBESITY; WOMEN

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Nutrition Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL;, Email: [email protected] 2: Professor, Department of Nutrition Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 3: Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Education, Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 4: Professor, Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

Publication date: September 1, 2016

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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