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DECOY: Documenting Experiences with Cigarettes and Other Tobacco in Young Adults

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Objectives: We examined psychographic characteristics associated with tobacco use among Project DECOY participants. Methods: Project DECOY is a 2-year longitudinal mixed-methods study examining risk for tobacco use among 3418 young adults across 7 Georgia colleges/universities. Baseline measures included sociodemographics, tobacco use, and psychographics using the Values, Attitudes, and Lifestyle Scale. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to identify correlates of tobacco use. Results: Past 30-day use prevalence was: 13.3% cigarettes; 11.3% little cigars/cigarillos (LCCs); 3.6% smokeless tobacco; 10.9% e-cigarettes; and 12.2% hookah. Controlling for sociodemographics, correlates of cigarette use included greater novelty seeking (p < .001) and intellectual curiosity (p = .010) and less interest in tangible creation (p = .002) and social conservatism (p < .001). Correlates of LCC use included greater novelty seeking (p < .001) and greater fashion orientation (p = .007). Correlates of smokeless tobacco use included greater novelty seeking (p = .006) and less intellectual curiosity (p < .001). Correlates of e-cigarette use included greater novelty seeking (p < .001) and less social conservatism (p = .002). Correlates of hookah use included greater novelty seeking (p < .001), fashion orientation (p = .044), and self-focused thinking (p = .002), and less social conservatism (p < .001). Conclusions: Psychographic characteristics distinguish users of different tobacco products.
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Keywords: ALTERNATIVE TOBACCO; RISK FACTORS; TOBACCO USE; YOUNG ADULTS

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Associate Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA;, Email: [email protected] 2: Research Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 3: Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 4: Project Coordinator, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 5: Professor and Chair, Department of Psychological Science, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA 6: Instructor, Department of Exercise Physiology, Valdosta State University, Valdosta, GA 7: Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Kinesiology, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA 8: Assistant Director, Burruss Institute, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA 9: Director, Center for Young Adult Addiction and Recovery, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA 10: Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Professor, Department of Nursing, Albany State University, Albany, GA 11: Executive Director, Campus Life, Central Georgia Technical College, Warner Robins, GA 12: Vice President for Adult Education, Athens Technical College, Athens, GA 13: Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 14: Department of Environmental Health, Emory University School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA

Publication date: May 1, 2016

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  • The American Journal of Health Behavior seeks to improve the quality of life through multidisciplinary health efforts in fostering a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of both individuals and social systems as they relate to health behaviors.

    The Journal aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the impact of personal attributes, personality characteristics, behavior patterns, social structure, and processes on health maintenance, health restoration, and health improvement; to disseminate knowledge of holistic, multidisciplinary approaches to designing and implementing effective health programs; and to showcase health behavior analysis skills that have been proven to affect health improvement and recovery.

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