Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Evaluating Online Sources: Helping Students Determine Trustworthiness, Readability, and Usefulness

Buy Article:

$19.95 + tax (Refund Policy)

Increasingly, young people are interacting with information from a range of complex online sources (e.g., images, videos, websites, etc.) that inform them about content that is typically part of social studies. This makes helping students learn to become skilled careful and critical readers of all texts (from textbooks, trade books, magazines, and newspapers to websites, music, and video) an especially important component of social studies education.1
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: March 1, 2012

More about this publication?
  • The goal of Social Studies and the Young Learner is to capture and enthuse elementary teachers across the country by providing relevant and useful information about the teaching of social studies to elementary students.The teaching techniques presented are designed to stimulate the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills vital to classroom success. SSYL is published quarterly: September/October; November/December; January/February; and March/April.
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Membership Information
  • Information for Advertisers
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more