Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Free Content Rapid response of the East Australian Current to remote wind forcing: The role of barotropic-baroclinic interactions

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 14,462.9 kb)
 
The strength of the East Australian Current (EAC) is observed to vary in response to changes in basin-scale winds in the South Pacific, with a time lag of three years. First mode baroclinic Rossby waves would take 10–15 years to reach the western boundary from the center of the South Pacific, so a faster mechanism is needed to explain this link. We use an ocean general circulation model forced with idealized anomalies of wind stress curl to examine the mechanism responsible for the rapid response of the EAC. A curl perturbation in the central South Pacific produces baroclinic and barotropic Rossby waves. The barotropic waves propagate quickly to the western boundary at New Zealand (NZ), where they scatter into a coastal Kelvin wave that travels anti-cyclonically around the coast of NZ. In the Tasman Sea, the height anomaly associated with the Kelvin wave spawns first mode baroclinic waves that take about three years to propagate across the Tasman Sea to influence the EAC. The model suggests that the rapid response of the EAC to changes in wind forcing can be explained by a combination of barotropic and baroclinic Rossby waves with conversion between modes facilitated by topography.

22 References.

No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: May 1, 2010

More about this publication?
  • The Journal of Marine Research, one of the oldest journals in American marine science, publishes peer-reviewed research articles covering a broad array of topics in physical, biological and chemical oceanography. Articles that deal with processes, as well as those that report significant observations, are welcome. Biological studies involving coupling between ecological and physical processes are preferred over those that report systematics. The editors strive always to serve authors and readers in the academic oceanographic community by publishing papers vital to the marine research in the long and rich tradition of the Sears Foundation for Marine Research. We welcome you to the Journal of Marine Research.
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Purchase The Sea
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more