Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

HOW TO ADVISE THE PRINCE: THREE RENAISSANCE FORMS OF PLUTARCHIAN PARRHESIA

Buy Article:

$22.14 + tax (Refund Policy)

This article sheds light on a little known chapter in the history of parrhesia. After a historiographical premise, the second and the third sections recall that parrhesia is conceived as a form of friendly admonition and is held to be the distinctive feature of good counsellors in Plutarch's How to Tell a Flatterer from a Friend. The next three sections show how Erasmus, Elyot and Castiglione reworked Plutarch's ideas in their mirrors for princes. The final references to Foucault's analysis of autocratic parrhesia make it clear that for these humanists, but not for Plutarch, parrhesia is also a process of moral conditioning by which counsellors advocate a system of values to be followed.
No References
No Citations
No Supplementary Data
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: Castiglione; Elyot; Erasmus; Parrhesia; Plutarch; giving advice

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: January 1, 2017

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more