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Immunotherapy with Peptides in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the interaction between hyperactive T cells and B cells causes a dysregulated production of autoantibodies that can lead to tissue damage and impaired organ function. Studies on the modalities of communication between T and B cells have led to the design of new therapeutics for SLE, including autoantibodyderived peptide immunotherapies. Since many autoantibodies in SLE patients have amino acid sequences similar to those of murine antibodies, and at similar locations, the current directions are to employ strategies that have given promising results in mice in human clinical settings. This review describes the experimental evidence, rationale, and preclinical models of autoantibody-derived peptide immunotherapy in SLE, and how this information is translating into clinical studies in humans.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1670, USA.

Publication date: April 1, 2009

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  • Current Medicinal Chemistry covers all the latest and outstanding developments in medicinal chemistry and rational drug design. Each issue contains a series of timely in-depth reviews written by leaders in the field covering a range of the current topics in medicinal chemistry. Current Medicinal Chemistry is an essential journal for every medicinal chemist who wishes to be kept informed and up-to-date with the latest and most important developments.
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