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Characterization of pDNA-TMC Nanoparticle Interaction and Stability

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Formulation of nanoparticulate DNA vaccines requires the assessment of stability and integrity of the components implicated. Stability of cationic nanoparticles made of N-trimethyl chitosan and chondroitin sulfate (TMC nanoparticles) was investigated in aqueous solution and after freeze-drying by characterization of their size, polydispersity index (PDI), and zeta potential. Furthermore, the structural integrity of plasmid DNA (pDNA) on adsorption to the nanoparticle surface was investigated. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed DNA retention when applied with the nanocarrier, suggesting that pDNA adsorption on nanoparticles took place. In circular dichroism (CD) spectra, ellipticity of pDNA decreased at 280 nm and increased at 245 nm, and the maximum wavelength shifted from 275 nm to 285 nm when nanoparticles were present. Once released from the particles, the secondary structure of the plasmid was retained in its native form. pDNA release from pDNA-TMC nanoparticles was indicated by a rise in zeta potential from initially -32 mV (pDNA adsorbed to particles) to 14 mV during one hour, and to 36 mV after 24 hours. Unloaded TMC nanoparticles remained stable in suspension for 24 hours, maintaining diameters of around 200 nm, and zeta potential values of approximately 38 mV. Freeze-drying with sucrose could ensure storage for 30 days, with minimal increase in size (291 nm) and charge (62 mV). In conclusion, TMC nanoparticles may potentially be freeze-dried in the presence of sucrose to be stored for prolonged periods of time. Furthermore, pDNA was successfully adsorbed to the cationic nanoparticles and remained intact after being released.
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Keywords: Beta conformation; DNA; TMC nanoparticles; circular dichroism; freeze-drying; stability

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: May 1, 2016

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  • The aim of Current Drug Delivery is to publish peer-reviewed articles, short communications, short and in-depth reviews in the rapidly developing field of drug delivery. Modern drug research aims to build in delivery properties of a drug at the design phase, however in many cases this ideal cannot be met and the development of delivery systems becomes as important as the development as the drugs themselves.

    The journal aims to cover the latest outstanding developments in drug and vaccine delivery employing physical, physico-chemical and chemical methods. The drugs include a wide range of bioactive compounds from simple pharmaceuticals to peptides, proteins, nucleotides, nucleosides and sugars. The journal will also report progress in the fields of transport routes and mechanisms including efflux proteins and multi-drug resistance.

    The journal is essential for all pharmaceutical scientists involved in drug design, development and delivery.
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