Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Open Access A Device that Allows Rodents to Behaviorally Thermoregulate when Housed in Vivariums

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 153 kb)
 
Laboratories and vivariums typically are maintained at ambient temperatures of 20 to 24 °C, leading to cold stress in mice. When mice are inactive and sleeping during the light phase, their zone of thermoneutrality associated with a basal metabolic rate is 30 to 32 °C. If given a choice, mice will use thermoregulatory behavior to seek out thermoneutral temperatures during the light phase. The cold stress of a vivarium can be problematic to researchers requiring an animal model that is not stressed metabolically. However, it may not be practical or economically feasible to maintain an animal vivarium at thermoneutral temperatures. One problem with raising the ambient temperature of a vivarium is that personnel wearing protective equipment will be subject to considerable heat stress. Here we present plans for the construction and operation of a device that allows mice to access a heated floor that is maintained at an approximate thermoneutral temperatures (30 to 32 °C). The device is made of inexpensive, readily available materials and uses a disposable hand warmer as a heat source. One hand warmer provides a thermoneutral environment for approximately 12 h. This device is easily adapted to a standard mouse or rat cage and requires only brief daily maintenance to change the heating pad. With this device in a standard cage, mice can select a warmer environment associated with thermoneutral conditions during the light phase and cooler ambient temperatures during the dark phase.
No References for this article.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina;, Email: [email protected] 2: Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 3: Department of Immunology, Rosewell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

Publication date: 01 March 2017

More about this publication?
  • The Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (JAALAS) serves as an official communication vehicle for the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS). The journal includes a section of refereed articles and a section of AALAS association news. The mission of the refereed section of the journal is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information on animal biology, technology, facility operations, management, and compliance as relevant to the AALAS membership. JAALAS accepts research reports (data-based) or scholarly reports (literature-based), with the caveat that all articles, including solicited manuscripts, must include appropriate references and must undergo peer review.

    Attention Members: To access the full text of the articles, be sure you are logged in to the AALAS website.

    Attention: please note, due to a temporary technical problem, reference linking within the content is not available at this time

  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Membership Information
  • Information for Advertisers
  • For issues prior to 1997
  • Institutional Subscription Activation
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more