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Open Access Longitudinal Anthropometric Assessment of Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Model of Huntington Disease

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The neurodegeneration associated with Huntington disease (HD) leads to the onset of motor and cognitive impairment and their advancement with increased age in humans. In children at risk for HD, body measurement growth abnormalities include a reduction in BMI, weight, height, and head circumference. The transgenic HD NHP model was first reported in 2008, and progressive decline in cognitive behaviors and motor impairment have been reported. This study focuses on longitudinal body measurements in HD macaques from infancy through adulthood. The growth of HD macaques was assessed through head circumference, sagittal and transverse head, and crown-to-rump ('height') measurements and BMI. The animals were measured monthly from 0 to 72 mo of age and every 3 mo from 72 mo of age onward. A mixed-effect model was used to assess subject-specific effects in our nonlinear serial data. Compared with WT controls, HD macaques displayed different developmental trajectories characterized by increased BMI, head circumference, and sagittal head measurements beginning around 40 mo of age. The physiologic comparability between NHP and humans underscores the translational utility of our HD macaques to evaluate growth and developmental patterns associated with HD.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Division of Neuropharmacology and Neurologic Diseases, Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 2: Division of Neuropharmacology and Neurologic Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 3: Marcus Autism Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Pediatrics, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 4: Division of Animal Resources, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 5: Division of Neuropharmacology and Neurologic Diseases, Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA., Email: [email protected]

Publication date: April 1, 2018

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  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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