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Open Access Cutaneous Toxicity in a Laboratory Beagle (Canis lupus familiaris) after Chronic Administration of Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

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An adult female beagle (Canis lupus familiaris) used in a model of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy presented with epithelial desquamation on the shoulders and ventrum after receiving the 8th weekly intravenous dose of the free form of doxorubicin (20 mg/m 2 ; total accumulation, 160 mg/m 2 ). The lesions were empirically treated with topical disinfectants and topical and systemic antibiotics. Despite treatment, the lesions progressed and ulcerated. Bacterial culture revealed Staphylococcus aureus, but trichogram, skin scraping, and fungal culture were negative for microorganisms. Skin biopsies revealed epidermal and apocrine gland hyperplasia, apocrine gland dilation, abnormal maturation of epithelial keratinocytes, and perivascular lymphocytic infiltration. These histopathologic findings resemble those in humans and canines after chronic administration of doxorubicin-containing pegylated liposomes. Here we report a clinical presentation after chronic administration of the free form of doxorubicin. In dogs, cutaneous toxicity after administration of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin is most often localized to the footpads, limbs, and axillary and urogenital regions. In the current case, lesions affected the ventrum and trunk but did not involve the footpads or axillary or urogenital regions.

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Document Type: Case Report

Affiliations: 1: Department of Comparative Medicine, Department of Medicine, Yale Translational Research Imaging Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 2: Department of Comparative Medicine, Department of Medicine, Yale Translational Research Imaging Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut;, Email: [email protected] 3: Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Yale Translational Research Imaging Center, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 4: Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, School of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 5: Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

Publication date: February 1, 2018

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  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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