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Open Access Assessment of Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Fibrosis after Renal Ischemia Protocols in Cats

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In an attempt to identify a feline model of acute or chronic kidney disease, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of 15 or 30 min of bilateral renal ischemia (RI) and 60 min of unilateral RI with delayed contralateral nephrectomy as models of acute kidney injury and chronic interstitial fibrosis in cats. Adult, purpose-bred, USDA Class A cats (n = 14) were randomly assigned to receive bilateral RI for 15 min (n = 3) or 30 min (n = 3), unilateral RI for 60 min with a delayed (2 wk) contralateral nephrectomy (n = 5), or sham unilateral RI with a delayed contralateral nephrectomy (n = 3). Serum creatinine concentration, urine specific gravity, and plasma clearance of iohexol were assessed at several time points throughout the study. Renal interstitial inflammatory cell counts and descriptive histopathology were acquired in all cats. Histomorphometry was used to quantify renal interstitial fibrosis and collagen at 120 d after RI in cats undergoing unilateral RI. Renal histopathology was evaluated at 21 and 120 d after bilateral and unilateral RI, respectively. Neither duration of bilateral RI resulted in appreciable histologic renal damage at 21 d after ischemia. At 120 d after ischemia, variable amounts of renal fibrosis were noted after 60 min of unilateral RI with delayed contralateral nephrectomy. Neither of the tested methods is a suitable model of consistent renal interstitial fibrosis in cats. Healthy cats appear able to sustain bilateral RI for as long as 30 min with no apparent effects on renal morphology or function at 21 d after ischemia.

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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Departments of Small Animal Medicine, Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 2: Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 3: Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 4: Departments of Small Animal Medicine, Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: February 1, 2017

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  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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