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Pharmacokinetics of Sucralose and Acesulfame-Potassium in Breast Milk Following Ingestion of Diet Soda

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Objective:

The aim of this study was to determine sucralose and acesulfame-potassium (ace-K) pharmacokinetics in breast milk following maternal ingestion of a diet soda.Methods:

Thirty-four exclusively breast-feeding women (14 normal-weight, 20 obese) consumed 12 ounces of Diet Rite Cola, sweetened with 68-mg sucralose and 41-mg ace-K, before a standardized breakfast meal. Habitual non-nutritional sweeteners intake was assessed via a diet questionnaire. Breast milk was collected from the same breast before beverage ingestion and hourly for 6 hours.
Results:

Owing to one mother having extremely high concentrations, peak sucralose and acesulfame-potassium concentrations following ingestion of diet soda ranged from 4.0 to 7387.9 ng/mL (median peak 8.1 ng/mL) and 299.0 to 4764.2 ng/mL (median peak 945.3 ng/mL), respectively.
Conclusions:

Ace-K and sucralose transfer into breast milk following ingestion of a diet soda. Future research should measure concentrations after repeated exposure and determine whether chronic ingestion of sucralose and acesulfame-potassium via the breast milk has clinically relevant health consequences.
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Keywords: appetite; infant nutrition; lactation; low-calorie sweeteners; taste

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Section on Pediatric Diabetes and Metabolism, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 2: Section on Pediatric Diabetes and Metabolism, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 3: Clinical Mass Spectrometry Core, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 4: Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma, OK.

Publication date: March 1, 2018

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