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MYB Translocation Status in Salivary Gland Epithelial-Myoepithelial Carcinoma

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Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma (EMC) is a malignant salivary gland neoplasm comprised of a biphasic arrangement of inner luminal ductal cells and outer myoepithelial cells. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is also a biphasic tumor comprised of ductal and myoepithelial cells, but these components tend to be arranged in a more cribriform pattern. The occurrence of “hybrid carcinomas” that show mixed patterns of EMC and AdCC raises questions about the relationship of these morphologically overlapping but clinically distinct tumors. AdCCs frequently harbor MYB-NFIB gene fusions. Mapping of EMCs (including hybrid forms with an AdCC component) for this fusion could help clarify the true nature of EMC as a distinct entity or simply as some variant form of AdCC. Twenty-nine cases of EMC were evaluated including 15 classic low-grade EMCs, 7 intermediate-grade EMCs, 2 EMCs with myoepithelial anaplasia, 1 EMC with high-grade transformation, and 4 hybrid EMCs with an AdCC component. Break apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYB was performed, as was MYB immunohistochemistry. For the hybrid carcinomas and those with high-grade transformation, the divergent tumor components were separately analyzed. A MYB translocation was identified in 5 of 28 (18%) tumors including 3 of 4 (75%) hybrid carcinomas and 2 of 7 (29%) intermediate-grade EMCs. For the positive hybrid carcinomas, the fusion was detected in both the EMC and AdCC components. The MYB fusion was not detected in any of the classic EMCs (0/15) or in any of the EMCs with myoepithelial anaplasia (0/2) or high-grade transformation (0/1). The fluorescence in situ hybridization assay was unsuccessful in 1 case. MYB immunostaining was seen in 5 of 5 fusion-positive cases, and also 9 of 23 fusion-negative tumors. Classic low-grade EMCs are genetically distinct from AdCCs in that they do not harbor MYB fusions. The presence of a MYB fusion in EMCs showing hybrid features of AdCC or exhibiting highly infiltrative growth points to a subset of these tumors that may well be true AdCCs masquerading as EMCs.
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Keywords: MYB-NFIB; adenoid cystic carcinoma; epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma; hybrid carcinoma

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 2: Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Publication date: March 1, 2018

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