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Studying the relationship between low back pain and working postures among those who stand and those who sit most of the working day

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A relationship between low back pain (LBP) and prolonged standing or prolonged sitting at work has not been clearly shown, despite its biological plausibility. Because sitting and standing postures vary as to duration and freedom to alternate postures, and standing postures vary as to mobility, associations between specific working postures and LBP were explored using multiple logistic regression. Associations between work factors and self-reported LBP during the previous 12 months that interfered with usual activities were examined among 4493 standing workers and 3237 sitting workers interviewed in the 1998 Quebec Health and Social Survey; 24.5% reported significant LBP. Since the same conditions can correspond to different physiological demands for sitting compared with standing workers, analyses were performed separately for the two groups. Standing without freedom to sit was associated with LBP. Different occupational physical and psychosocial factors were associated with LBP in sitting compared with standing populations.
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Keywords: gender-based analysis; low back pain; prolonged standing; work-related musculoskeletal disorders; working postures

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Centre for the Study of Biological Interactions in Human Health, CINBIOSE, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada 2: Centre for the Study of Biological Interactions in Human Health, CINBIOSE, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada,Groupe scientifique sur les troubles musculo-squelettiques lies au travail, RBEO, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, and Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal, 3: Groupe scientifique sur les troubles musculo-squelettiques lies au travail, RBEO, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, and Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Universite de Montreal,

Publication date: November 1, 2009

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