Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Change of search time and non-search time in X-ray baggage screening due to training

Buy Article:

$61.00 + tax (Refund Policy)

As found in studies of aircraft structural inspection, the time used for judging if a part of an aircraft shows tiny cracks is composed of search time, used for actively scanning, and non-search time, used for matching and decision while fixating a region of interest (Drury et al. 1997). These findings can be applied to detection of threats by X-ray screening of passenger bags at airports. To investigate whether search time and non-search time change when an experienced screener is given additional training in recognising threat objects in passenger bags, data from a European airport were analysed. A comparison of detection performance and reaction time between two large groups of screeners, one trained for 6 months, shows a large impact of training on overall performance and on both search and non-search components of the task. There was also a small but consistent decline in performance measures with screener age. This study shows a way to localise the effect of training on threat detection performance for aviation security screening. Analysis of the time needed for screening each passenger bag showed that training had a significant effect, particularly on the non-search part of the searching process (i.e. identification, recognition, decision, response execution, etc.).
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: X-ray baggage screening; aviation security; non-search time; search time; training effect; visual search

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland,School of Applied Psychology, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), Olten, Switzerland 2: Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University at Buffalo: SUNY, Buffalo, NY, USA 3: School of Applied Psychology, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), Olten, Switzerland,Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Publication date: June 1, 2009

More about this publication?
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more