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Effect of allogeneic blood transfusion on levels of IL6 and sILR2 in peripheral blood of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

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Effect of allogeneic blood transfusion on the expression of interleukin6 (IL6) and soluble interleukin2 receptor (sIL2R) in peripheral blood of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was investigated. A total of 91 ALL children admitted to Nanfang Hospital from June 2014 to January 2017 were selected as the study group. Patients were randomly divided into allogeneic blood transfusion group (n=38) and nontransfusion group (n=53). In addition, a total of 64 healthy children were also selected from June 2014 to January 2017 as the control group. Patients in allogeneic blood transfusion group were transfused with red blood cell suspension and machinecollected platelets, while patients in nontransfusion group were not treated with blood transfusion. Peripheral venous blood was collected before and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after blood transfusion to prepare serum. Serum IL6 and sIL2R levels were measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Before transfusion, serum levels of IL6 and sIL2R were significantly lower in the study group than those in control group (p<0.05), and no significant differences in serum levels of IL6 and sIL2R were found between the allogeneic blood transfusion and nontransfusion group. After transfusion, serum levels of IL6 and sIL2R were stable for 12 weeks in the nontransfusion group, while IL6 and sIL2R levels were significantly increased in the allogeneic blood transfusion group. The results showed that serum level of IL6 and sIL2R was increased in ALL patients with allogeneic blood transfusion, which resulted in reduced antibody production and decreased cellular immunity. The patients had low immunity, and attention should be paid on the pathogen infection prevention.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Blood Transfusion, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University/The First School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, P.R. China 2: Department of Clinical Laboratory, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University/The First School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, P.R. China 3: Department of Pediatrics, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University/The First School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, P.R. China 4: Department of Stomatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University/The First School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, P.R. China

Publication date: July 1, 2018

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  • Oncology Letters is a monthly, peer-reviewed journal, available in print and online, that focuses on all aspects of clinical oncology, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental model systems relevant to the mechanisms of disease.

    The principal aim of Oncology Letters is to provide the prompt publication of original studies of high quality that pertain to clinical oncology, chemotherapy, oncogenes, carcinogenesis, metastasis, epidemiology and viral oncology in the form of original research, reviews and case reports.
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