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Effects of dietary trans9 octadecenoic acid, trans11 vaccenic acid and cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid in mice

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The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dietary trans fatty acids in mice. Following the administration of a 0.5/100 g diet of trans9 octadecenoic acid (EA), trans11 vaccenic acid (TVA) or cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) for 4 weeks, the body weights and the weights of the liver, testis and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) of the animals gradually decreased (P<0.05). The EA group exhibited the lowest levels of magnesium and triglycerides (P<0.05). CLA increased villus length (P<0.05), while EA and TVA decreased villus length (P<0.05). The TVA group exhibited the lowest levels of lowdensity lipoprotein and tumor necrosis factorα (P<0.05). Taken together, EA, TVA and CLA affected the physiological conditions of mice differently. The potential effects of three well-known fatty acids, including trans9 octadecenoic acid (EA), trans11 vaccenic acid (TVA) and cis9, trans11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), in animals or humans remain to be elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, 32 animals were randomly divided into four groups and administered a 0.5/100 g diet of EA, TVA or CLA for 4 weeks. The results demonstrated that the body weights and the weights of the liver, testis and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) of the animals gradually decreased (P<0.05). Blood was collected individually via the external jugular veins and the EA group exhibited the lowest levels of magnesium and triglycerides (P<0.05). CLA increased villus length (P<0.05), while EA and TVA decreased villus length (P<0.05). The TVA group exhibited the lowest levels of lowdensity lipoprotein and tumor necrosis factorα (P<0.05). Taken together, EA, TVA and CLA affected the physiological conditions of mice differently and these may further our understanding of the various effects of these fatty acids on animals and humans.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, College of Animal Science and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130118, P.R. China 2: Department of Animal Science and Technology, College of Animal Bioscience and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul 143701, Republic of Korea 3: Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Natural Resources and Life Science, Pusan National University, Miryang, Gyeongnam 627706, Republic of Korea 4: Lab of Animal Physiology, Graduate School of Agriculture Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 9888555, Japan

Publication date: August 1, 2015

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  • Molecular Medicine Reports is a monthly, peer-reviewed journal available in print and online, that includes studies devoted to molecular medicine, underscoring aspects including pharmacology, pathology, genetics, neurosciences, infectious diseases, molecular cardiology and molecular surgery. In vitro and in vivo studies of experimental model systems pertaining to the mechanisms of a variety of diseases offer researchers the necessary tools and knowledge with which to aid the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.
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