Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Open Access Estimation of stress state and detailed structure at shallow plate boundary based on 3D seismic data

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 774 kb)
 
The Earth's crust is a dynamic place, consisting of the large tectonic plates that sit atop the mantle, the extremely hot, high pressure zone of material between the crust and the core. The first several tens kilometres of the Earth's shell, the crust and uppermost mantle, is moving and shifting, causing the oceanic and continental plates to bang and crash with one another, resulting in the earthquakes and tsunamis that dramatically impact the countries at the boundaries of the plates. While the world takes notice when one of these disasters happen, we don't realise that there is constant activity in these zones causing measurable seismic waves to regularly ripple through the crust. Using artificially-generated seismic waves can help researchers to understand more about how the crust and upper mantle behave. Depending on the positioning of the plates and the nature of the crust, i.e., thickness, direction of movement and composition, the behaviour will differ. By using 'controlled sources' in marine seismic experiments, such as air-gun shooting, scientists are able to gather as much data as possible regarding the factors influencing the behaviours of the plates to help provide a better understanding of the processes leading to earthquakes.One organisation that builds and operates via international collaboration is the Japan Agency For Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). Dr Ryuta Arai joined the Structural Seismology Group of JAMSTEC in 2014 and is now a scientist at the Research Institute for Marine Geodynamics of JAMSTEC. Arai is part of a team of researchers from Japan, New Zealand, the United States and the United Kingdom who are investigating the physical properties of the seismogenic area in the Hikurangi subduction zone.
No References for this article.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: ANISOTROPY; EARTHQUAKES; HIKURANGI SUBDUCTION ZONE; OCEAN BOTTOM SEISMOGRAPH; SEISMOGENIC ZONE; SEISMOLOGY; SUBDUCTION BOUNDARY FAULTS; TSUNAMIS; VELOCITY STRUCTURE

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: May 1, 2020

More about this publication?
  • Impact is a series of high-quality, open access and free to access science reports designed to enable the dissemination of research impact to key stakeholders. Communicating the impact and relevance of research projects across a large number of subjects in a content format that is easily accessible by an academic and stakeholder audience. The publication features content from the world's leading research councils, policy groups, universities and research projects. Impact is published under a CC-BY Creative Commons licence.

  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Disseminating research in Impact
  • Information about Impact
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more