Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Open Access Molecular mechanism of smoking smell and elucidation of regeneration environment of olfactory epithelium

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 320.2 kb)
 
Research by Assistant Professor Rumi Ueha takes into consideration a range of environmental factors affecting the sense of smell, including age, inflammation and cigarette smoke. She highlights: 'Significant oxidation occurs to human beings exposed to daily life-creating stress and chronic rhinitis in the nasal region, and smoking is involved in the onset and deterioration of olfaction.' Risk factors for the onset of chronic nasal and secondary nasal disorders affect sense of smell by impairing the olfactory epithelium and changing the flow of air that exacerbates mucous membrane inflammation of the cavity, resulting in both breathing and olfactory disorders. Olfactory disorders can occur as a result of a variety of factors ranging from ageing to toxic chemical exposure, airway allergies, upper-airway viral infections, head trauma or development of neurodegenerative diseases, and in most cases loss of olfactory senses is a characteristic symptom. With an ageing population and increasing incidences of respiratory infections and asthma, as well as allergy related illnesses such as rhinitis, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the molecular mechanism of the pathology and understand the impact of upper respiratory tract infections as a result of environmental factors such as smoking. Ueha outlines three key objectives to her research: 'The objectives are to understand at the molecular level the effect of cigarette smoke on olfactory mechanisms, to assess how smoking can influence olfactory epithelium homeostasis and epithelial disorder recovery process, and determine how the age of patients can influence inflammation and recovery.' The analysis will focus on histological analysis of changes to cells at the molecular level
No References for this article.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: AGEING; CIGARETTE SMOKE; DETERIORATION OF OLFACTORY DISORDER; DEVELOPMENT OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES; MUCOSAL INFLAMMATION; OLFACTION; OLFACTORY EPITHELIUM; OLFACTORY MECHANISMS; OLFACTORY PROGENITOR CELLS; OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS; SMOKING; TOXIC CHEMICAL EXPOSURE

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: June 1, 2019

More about this publication?
  • Impact is a series of high-quality, open access and free to access science reports designed to enable the dissemination of research impact to key stakeholders. Communicating the impact and relevance of research projects across a large number of subjects in a content format that is easily accessible by an academic and stakeholder audience. The publication features content from the world's leading research councils, policy groups, universities and research projects. Impact is published under a CC-BY Creative Commons licence.

  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Disseminating research in Impact
  • Information about Impact
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more