Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Open Access Takashi Suzuki Laboratory Research (including materials, biology and medical research)

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 262.3 kb)
 
Applying mathematical modelling to scientific problems such as tumour growth and nonlinear phenomena, Professor Takashi Suzuki provides both his own lab and many scientists in other fields with a deeper insight into key environmental processes.

Mathematics is sometimes referred to as the 'universal language'. It is a set of properties that all humans can understand, regardless of culture, religion or language. This unifying ability of mathematics also applies to the various fields within science. Basic sciences such as physics, chemistry and biology, as well as applied sciences like engineering and medicine, are all intimately linked by the principles of mathematics. By applying mathematical analysis to these diverse scientific fields, several key problems within the natural sciences can be solved. These problems span from the analysis and modelling of nonlinear phenomena to ill-posed problems to variational problems to mathematical oncology.

Each of these mathematical problems are of interest to Professor Takashi Suzuki. In his lab at the Center for Mathematical Modeling and Data Science at Osaka University, Suzuki and his team are focusing their efforts on developing mathematical models that link these problems together to provide logical and applicable solutions. These solutions can, in turn, break down complex mathematical phenomena and provide a solid foundation that spans across all scientific disciplines. Additionally, they can be applied in medical settings to aid in scenarios such as cancer research and treatment.

One of Suzuki's studies in mathematical oncology focused on 'basement membrane degradation' in cells, a process that occurs at the early stage of cancer invasion. This stage allows the cancer to infiltrate the extracellular matrix (ECM) and fully take over the cell. Currently, biologists theorise that the enzyme, MMP, involved in basement membrane degradation is recruited to the cell's plasma membrane by a molecule called TIMP2. Using mathematical modelling, Suzuki and his team have been able to provide biologists with a clear pathway that enables MMP to bind to the cell and activate basement membrane degradation. With this model, biologists can develop treatments that will intercept this pathway and halt cancer progression before it can metastasise.

On multicellular level, Suzuki's team has also studied the formation of invadopodia: protrusions of the plasma membrane that are filled with actin protein and associated with the degradation of the ECM during early stage cancer invasion. From a mathematical perspective, these membrane protrusions are a result of a positive feedback loop that asserts actin reorganisation. Recently, Suzuki's lab constructed a multiscale model of invadopodia that was successfully simulated on a computer. As seen in the molecular-based mathematical model, this multiscale model can greatly benefit biologists who wish to further understand the cellular process that occur before a cell is overtaken by cancer.
No References for this article.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: BASEMENT MEMBRANE DEGRADATION IN CELLS; CELLULAR PROCESS; CENTER FOR MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND DATA SCIENCE; COMPUTER SIMULATION; EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM); MATHEMATICAL MODELLING; MATHEMATICAL ONCOLOGY; MOLECULAR-BASED MATHEMATICAL MODEL; MULTISCALE MODEL OF INVADOPODIA; NONLINEAR PHENOMENA; PLASMA MEMBRANE; TUMOUR GROWTH

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: December 1, 2018

More about this publication?
  • Impact is a series of high-quality, open access and free to access science reports designed to enable the dissemination of research impact to key stakeholders. Communicating the impact and relevance of research projects across a large number of subjects in a content format that is easily accessible by an academic and stakeholder audience. The publication features content from the world's leading research councils, policy groups, universities and research projects. Impact is published under a CC-BY Creative Commons licence.

  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Terms & Conditions
  • Disseminating research in Impact
  • Information about Impact
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more