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Narratives of ‘doing, knowing, being and becoming’: examining the impact of an attachment-informed approach within initial teacher education

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The Scottish Government’s vision of improving outcomes for children prioritises attachment theory and research in promoting children’s well-being across children’s services. This theme is also noted as increasing international relevance. Our narrative research springs from the experience of designing and delivering the first course within initial teacher education in Scotland to focus on the application of attachment theory to the role and identity of the teacher – particularly, in supporting children vulnerable through experiences of trauma and adversity. We capture students’ ‘real time’ learning moments through reflective journaling during school experience within the analytic ‘Doing, knowing, being and becoming’. Emergent themes include: looking behind and responding to behaviours, making links with ‘lived lives’, understanding teachers’ potential as attachment figures and ‘secure base’, understanding the relevance of adult attachment theory and resilience/self-care to teachers’ emotions and their own attachment experiences.
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Keywords: Initial teacher education; attachment; narrative; resilience; self-care

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: School of Education, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

Publication date: August 8, 2017

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