Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Necromancy and the Magical Reputation of Michael Scot: John Rylands Library, Latin MS 105

Buy Article:

$31.91 + tax (Refund Policy)

Necromancy, the practice of conjuring and controlling evil spirits, was a popular pursuit in the courts and cloisters of late medieval and early modern Europe. Books that gave details on how to conduct magical 'experiments' circulated widely. Written pseudonymously under the name of the astrologer and translator Michael Scot (d. 1236), Latin MS 105 from the John Rylands Library, Manchester, is notable for the inclusion, at the beginning of the manuscript, of a corrupted, unreadable text that purports to be the 'Arabic' original. Other recensions of the handbook, which generally travelled under the pseudo-Arabic title of Almuchabola Absegalim Alkakib Albaon, also stressed the experiment's non-Western origins. Using Latin MS 105 as the main case study, this article aims to investigate the extent to which a magic book's paratextual data conveyed a sense of 'authority' to its contemporary audience.
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Citation information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: Magic; Michael Scot; demons; necromancy

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: University of Manchester

Publication date: March 1, 2016

More about this publication?
  • The John Rylands Library houses one of the finest collections of rare books, manuscripts and archives in the world. The collections span five millennia and cover a wide range of subjects, including art and archaeology; economic, social, political, religious and military history; literature, drama and music; science and medicine; theology and philosophy; travel and exploration. For over a century, the Bulletin of the John Rylands Library has published research that complements the Library's special collections. The editors invite the submission of articles in these fields and welcome discussion of in-progress projects.

    Areas of particular interest include, but are not limited to:

    • Manuscript and archive studies
    • Textual transmission and bibliographical studies
    • The histories of printing and publishing
    • The transmission and reception of the Bible
    • The history of religion, with particular regard to evangelical Christianity and the Dissenting and Nonconformist traditions
    • Visual culture, including manuscript illumination and the printed image
    • Social and cultural history, and the history of medicine

    The editors also invite the submission of descriptive articles or shorter notices pertinent to items in the Library collections and those held in other institutions of the University of Manchester. Further information can be found in the Library's Guide to Special Collections.

    The complete archive of the Bulletin of the John Rylands Library, from its first issue in 1903 to Volume 80 (1998) is now available to purchase from Manchester University Press. The integration of the archive brings all of the journal's content together online for the first time, offering the opportunity for the journal's influential research to be easily discovered and browsed.

    The archive complements the current subscription product (1999 to date), and can be purchased on a one-time basis or as an annual subscription. By purchasing or licensing the archive, subscribers to the Bulletin will benefit from access to the complete collection of content back to issue 1.

    To obtain pricing information, please contact Shelly Turner at [email protected].

    Selected articles from the Bulletin are also available via the University of Manchester Library.

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more