Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Free Content Fluoroquinolone exposure prior to tuberculosis diagnosis is associated with an increased risk of death

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 239.8 kb)
 
SETTING: Fluoroquinolone (FQ) exposure before tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis is common, but its effect on outcomes, including mortality, is unclear.

DESIGN: Among TB patients reported to the Tennessee Department of Health from 2007 to 2009, we assessed FQ exposure within 6 months before TB diagnosis. The primary outcome was the combined endpoint of death at the time of TB diagnosis and during anti-tuberculosis treatment.

RESULTS: Among 609 TB cases, 214 (35%) received FQs within 6 months before TB diagnosis. A total of 71 (12%) persons died; 10 (2%) were dead at TB diagnosis and 61 (10%) died during anti-tuberculosis treatment. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors independently associated with death were older age (OR 1.05 per year, 95%CI 1.04–1.07), human immunodeficiency virus infection (OR 8.08, 95%CI 3.83–17.06), US birth (OR 3.03, 95%CI 1.03–9.09), and any FQ exposure before TB diagnosis (OR 1.82, 95%CI 1.05–3.15). Persons with FQ exposure before TB diagnosis were more likely to have culture- and smear-positive disease than unexposed persons.

CONCLUSIONS: Among this patient population, FQ exposure before TB diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of death. These findings underscore the need for cautious use of FQs in persons with possible TB.
No Reference information available - sign in for access.
No Supplementary Data.
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: drug resistance; drug-susceptible TB; mortality

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA 2: Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, Tennessee, USA 3: Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, Tennessee, USA 4: Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA 5: Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Center for Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Publication date: September 1, 2012

More about this publication?
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease publishes articles on all aspects of lung health, including public health-related issues such as training programmes, cost-benefit analysis, legislation, epidemiology, intervention studies and health systems research. The IJTLD is dedicated to the continuing education of physicians and health personnel and the dissemination of information on lung health world-wide.

    To share scientific research of immediate concern as rapidly as possible, The Union is fast-tracking the publication of certain articles from the IJTLD and publishing them on The Union website, prior to their publication in the Journal. Read fast-track articles.

    Certain IJTLD articles are also selected for translation into French, Spanish, Chinese or Russian. These are available on the Union website.

  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
  • Public Health Action
  • Ingenta Connect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more