Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Bilateral Thyroarytenoid Cartilage Lateralization and Vocal Fold Excision with Mucosoplasty for Treatment of Idiopathic Laryngeal Paralysis: 67 Dogs (1998–2005)

Buy Article:

$52.00 + tax (Refund Policy)

Objective

To evaluate combined bilateral thyroarytenoid cartilage lateralization, vocal fold excision, and mucosoplasty technique (BTAL) through ventral median laryngotomy for treatment of laryngeal paralysis in dogs. Design

Retrospective study. Animals

Dogs (n=67) with laryngeal paralysis. Methods

Medical records were reviewed for dogs with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis that had BTAL between January 1998 and March 2005. Retrieved data included signalment, history, physical and laryngoscopic examination findings, clinicopathologic tests, and results of recheck examination findings. Results

BTAL was performed by a single surgeon. Short-term (<6 months) follow-up information was available for 67 dogs and long-term (>12 months) for 40 dogs. Major postoperative complications were surgical failures (13; 7 short term, 6 long term) and aspiration pneumonia (1). Mean recurrence of clinical signs was at 19 weeks (range, 2–30 weeks). Minor complications occurred in 22 (33%) dogs including occasional coughing or gagging, stridorous breathing during exercise, panting, noisy or heavy breathing, and aspiration pneumonia (3 dogs) that did not require hospitalization. All owners reported an improved quality of life and had no regrets with surgical outcome. Conclusions

BTAL is seemingly an effective procedure for treatment of laryngeal paralysis. Clinical Relevance

BTAL is associated with a low incidence of aspiration pneumonia; however, there is substantial risk of recurrence of clinical signs associated with narrowing of the glottis. Consequently, unilateral arytenoid lateralization currently represents the accepted approach to the treatment of laryngeal paralysis.
No References
No Citations
No Supplementary Data
No Article Media
No Metrics

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: Veterinary Referral Center, Malvern, PA.

Publication date: August 1, 2007

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more