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Prognostic Factors in Treating Antebrachial Growth Deformities with a Lengthening Procedure Using a Circular External Skeletal Fixation System in Dogs

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Objective

To evaluate treatment of antebrachial growth deformities (AGD) with a lengthening procedure using a circular external skeletal fixation (CESF) system and to determine prognostic factors. Study Design

Prospective clinical study. Animals

Thirty-four dogs with unilateral AGD. Methods

Length deficits, angular and rotational deformities, elbow incongruity (EI), osteoarthritis (OA) of the elbow and carpal joint, function, and cosmesis were determined before and after a CESF lengthening procedure. Results

On admission, EI (21 dogs; 62%), OA of the elbow joint (17 dogs; 50%), carpal OA (12 dogs; 35%), and concomitant elbow and carpal OA (5 dogs; 7%) were common findings. Treatment significantly improved function (normal, 20 dogs; 60%) and cosmesis (normal, 22 dogs; 65%). Angular and rotational deformities were almost completely corrected with small remaining length deficits. Elbow and carpal OA increased significantly during the follow-up period. Significant correlations were demonstrated between initial elbow OA and final function (R=0.42, P=.02), initial function and final function (R=0.41, P=.02), and initial ulnar and radial deficit and final cosmesis (R=0.58, P=.0001 and R=0.45, P=.008). Conclusions

Treatment of AGD by a CESF lengthening procedure was successful despite small remaining length deficits. Initial elbow OA, function, and ulnar and radial length deficits are prognostic factors in the treatment of AGD. Clinical Relevance

Initial elbow OA and initial function are prognostic factors in predicting the functional outcome of treatment of AGD with a CESF lengthening procedure in the dog.
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Keywords: antebrachial growth deformity; circular external skeletal fixation; dog; radius; ulna

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Division of Orthopedics and Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Publication date: September 1, 2005

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