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Influence of inflammation and coat type on oestrogen receptor immunohistochemistry

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate oestrogen receptor alpha staining in a variety of breeds and skin conditions. The influence of inflammation and coat type on the presence and intensity of oestrogen receptor alpha staining was evaluated. Approximately 1700 haematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained slides of skin biopsies were screened for presence of small hair bulbs. Slides from 94 cases were submitted for oestrogen receptor alpha immunohistochemistry. H&E-stained skin biopsy tissues were examined for inflammation and hair follicle stages. Oestrogen receptor alpha staining characteristics of telogen follicles, flame follicles, large anagen bulbs, small hair bulbs and early anagen hairs (capped bulbs) were recorded. To assess the influence of inflammation and coat type on oestrogen receptor staining of hair follicle types, chi-square tests, Fisher's exact tests and logistic regression models were performed. Slides were classified as inflammatory (65) and noninflammatory (29). There were no statistically significant differences in oestrogen receptor staining when comparing inflammatory to noninflammatory skin biopsies or skin biopsies from dogs with different coat types. A subset of 13 noninflammatory biopsies from alopecic skin was identified. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of flame follicles in this subset as compared to all others. Comparison of oestrogen receptor staining of hair follicle types from these biopsies and all other biopsies revealed a statistically significant increase in the number of mature telogen hair follicles stained in this subset. No statistical difference in staining of early follicle stages was noted. Therefore, the oestrogen receptor is unlikely to be the controlling factor for the transition from telogen to anagen in the dog.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology, University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, Tennessee 2: Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventative Medicine, University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, Tennessee 3: Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, University of Tennessee, College of Veterinary Medicine, Knoxville, Tennessee

Publication date: October 1, 2008

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