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Free Content A rice calcium‐dependent protein kinase OsCPK12 oppositely modulates salt‐stress tolerance and blast disease resistance

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Summary

Calcium‐dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) regulate the downstream components in calcium signaling pathways. We investigated the effects of overexpression and disruption of an Oryza sativa (rice) CDPK (OsCPK12) on the plant’s response to abiotic and biotic stresses. OsCPK12‐overexpressing (OsCPK12‐OX) plants exhibited increased tolerance to salt stress. The accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the leaves was less in OsCPK12‐OX plants than in wild‐type (WT) plants. Genes encoding reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes (OsAPx2 and OsAPx8) were more highly expressed in OsCPK12‐OX plants than in WT plants, whereas the expression of the NADPH oxidase gene, OsrbohI, was decreased in OsCPK12‐OX plants compared with WT plants. Conversely, a retrotransposon (Tos17) insertion mutant, oscpk12, and plants transformed with an OsCPK12 RNA interference (RNAi) construct were more sensitive to high salinity than were WT plants. The level of H2O2 accumulation was greater in oscpk12 and OsCPK12 RNAi plants than in the WT. These results suggest that OsCPK12 promotes tolerance to salt stress by reducing the accumulation of ROS. We also observed that OsCPK12‐OX seedlings had increased sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and increased susceptibility to blast fungus, probably resulting from the repression of ROS production and/or the involvement of OsCPK12 in the ABA signaling pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that OsCPK12 functions in multiple signaling pathways, positively regulating salt tolerance and negatively modulating blast resistance.
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Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 2-1-2 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602, Japan 2: Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan

Publication date: January 1, 2012

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