Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

Tuberculosis treatment in complex emergencies: are risks outweighing benefits?

Buy Article:

$43.00 plus tax (Refund Policy)

Summary

Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in complex emergencies. Humanitarian agencies usually postpone the decision to offer TB treatment and opportunities to treat TB patients are often missed. This paper looks at the problem of tuberculosis treatment in these emergencies and questions whether treatment guidelines could be more flexible than international recommendations. A mathematical model is used to calculate the risks and benefits of different treatment scenarios with increasing default rates. Model outcomes are compared to a situation without treatment. An economic analysis further discusses the findings in a trade-off between the extra costs of treating relapses and failures and the savings in future treatment costs. In complex emergencies, if a TB programme could offer 4-month treatment for 75% of its patients, it could still be considered beneficial in terms of public health. In addition, the proportion of patients following at least 4 months of treatment can be used as an indicator to help evaluate the public health harm and benefit of the TB programme.
No References
No Citations
No Supplementary Data
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: complex emergencies; compliance rate; drug resistance; early treatment result; economic analysis; modelling; tuberculosis

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Brussels, Belgium 2: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

Publication date: 01 March 2003

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more