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Intrinsic in vitro susceptibility of primary clinical isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus nidulans, Candida albicans and Candida lusitaniae against amphotericin B

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Summary

A total of 60 clinical fungal isolates from patients without prior amphotericin B treatment and three control strains were evaluated for their intrinsic susceptibility to amphotericin B (AmB) using microdilution, Etest and disc diffusion assays, on three media each, Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640, Antibiotic Medium 3 (AM3) and High Resolution Medium. The fungal strains included isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus (n = 10), Aspergillus terreus (n = 12), Aspergillus nidulans (n = 9), Candida albicans (n = 6) and Candida lusitaniae (n = 23). The A. terreus strains were significantly less susceptible to AmB than the A. fumigatus strains in all nine experimental settings (P-values ranging from 0.009 to <0.00001). The A. nidulans strains were equally susceptible to AmB as the A. fumigatus strains in seven of nine experimental settings and less susceptible in two (microdilution performed on RPMI and AM3, P = 0.01 and 0.007). The C. lusitaniae strains were equally susceptible to AmB as the C. albicans strains in seven of nine experimental settings and more susceptible in two (microdilution and Etest, both performed on AM3, P = 0.01 and 0.0002). Thus, we confirmed that A. terreus is intrinsically less susceptible to AmB than A. fumigatus. In contrast, nine German clinical isolates of Aspergillus nidulans were found equally susceptible to AmB as 10 isolates of A. fumigatus. Furthermore, we found 23 German clinical isolates of C. lusitaniae from patients without prior treatment with AmB equally susceptible to AmB as C. albicans.
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Keywords: Aspergillus; Candida; amphotericin B; susceptibility testing

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Haema Institute of Laboratory Medicine at the Helios Medical Center, Erfurt, Germany 2: Department of Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, University Hospital, Rostock, Germany 3: Institute of Medical Laboratory Diagnostics and Microbiology, S├╝dharzkrankenhaus Nordhausen, Germany

Publication date: March 1, 2006

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