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Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

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Background 

Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods 

Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK were administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The Staff Support Questionnaire (SSQ), and The Shortened Ways of Coping (Revised) Questionnaire (SWC-R). Results 

Although staff reported high levels of job satisfaction, they experienced moderate degrees of emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment and reported a high propensity to leave the service. Factors identified as relating to staff morale were staff support and supervision, role clarity, wishful thinking, staff cooperation, and other practical issues regarding the day-to-day running of the service. Conclusions 

Staff in day care services for people with intellectual disabilities experience similar stressors to those experienced by staff in residential facilities with the informal culture of the service being of most importance to staff morale. Suggestions for the enhancement of staff morale are provided.
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Keywords: intellectual disabilities; intended turnover; job satisfaction; staff burnout

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: May 1, 2007

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