Skip to main content
padlock icon - secure page this page is secure

A Zn(II)–glycine complex suppresses UVB-induced melanin production by stimulating metallothionein expression

Buy Article:

$52.00 + tax (Refund Policy)

Synopsis Oxidative stress caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the skin, induces the secretion of melanocyte growth and activating factors from keratinocytes, which results in the formation of cutaneous hyper-pigmentation. Thus, increasing the anti-oxidative ability of skin cells is expected to be a good strategy for skin-lightening cosmetics. Metallothionein (MT) is one of the stress-induced proteins and is known to exhibit a strong anti-oxidative property. We previously reported that a zinc(II) complex with glycine (Zn(II)(Gly)) effectively induces MT expression in cultured human keratinocytes. To determine its potential as a new skin lightening active, we examined whether Zn(II)(Gly) regulates the release of melanocyte-activating factors from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes and affects melanin production in a reconstructed human epidermal equivalent. Conditioned medium from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes accelerated melanocyte proliferation to 110%, and that increase could be prevented by pre-treatment with Zn(II)(Gly). In addition, Zn(II)(Gly) significantly reduced both the production of prostaglandin E and proopiomelanocortin expression in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes. Zn(II)(Gly) also decreased melanin production in a reconstructed human epidermal equivalent. These results indicate that MT-induction in the epidermis effectively up-regulates tolerance against oxidative stress and inhibits the secretion of melanocyte growth and activating factors from keratinocytes. Thus, Zn(II)(Gly) is a good candidate as a new skin-lightening active.

French
Résumé

Le stress oxydatif provoqué par les radiations ultra-violettes (UV) génère des espèces oxygénées réactives (ROS) dans la peau et induit la croissance des mélanocytes et la sécrétion par les kératinocytes de facteurs d’activation, provoquant la formation de l’hyperpigmentation cutanée. On peut alors penser qu’accroître les propriétés anti-oxydantes des cellules cutanées sera une bonne stratégie pour l’obtention des produits de blanchiment cutané cosmétique. La métallothionéine (MT) est une des protéines induite par ce stress et elle est connue pour posséder de fortes propriétés anti-oxydantes. Nous avons précédemment montré que les complexes de Zinc (II) avec la glycine (Zn (II) (Gly)2) provoquent efficacement l’expression de la MT dans des cultures de kératinocytes humains. Afin de déterminer son potentiel en tant que nouvel actif de produit de blanchiment cutané, nous avons recherché si le (Zn (II) (Gly)2) régule la libération de facteurs d’activation de mélanocytes à partir de kératinocytes irradiés sous UVB et dans quelle mesure il affecte la production de mélanine dans un équivalent d’épiderme humain reconstruit. Le milieu dans lequel sont placés des kératinocytes sous UVB accélère la prolifération de mélanocytes de 110% et cette augmentation peut être empêchée par un prétraitement avec le (Zn (II) (Gly)2). En plus, le (Zn (II) (Gly)2) réduit de façon significative à la fois la production de prostaglandine E2 et l’expression de la proopiomélanocortine dans les kératinocytes irradiés sous UVB. Le (Zn (II) (Gly)2) diminue également la production de mélanine dans un équivalent d’épiderme humain reconstruit. Ces résultats indiquent que l’induction de MT dans l’épiderme régule efficacement la tolérance contre le stress oxydatif et inhibe la croissance des mélanocytes et la sécrétion par les kératinocytes de facteurs d’activation. Ainsi, le (Zn (II) (Gly)2) est un bon candidat en tant que nouvel actif de blanchiment cutané.
No References
No Citations
No Supplementary Data
No Article Media
No Metrics

Keywords: keratinocytes; melanocytes; metallothionein; reactive oxygen species; ultraviolet

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Cosmos Technical Center Co., Ltd, 3-24-3 Hasune, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-0046 2: Sun Clinic, Sun Care Institute, 3-3-18 Dojima, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-0003 3: Division of Dermatology, Department of Clinical Molecular Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 4: Department of Analytical and Bioinorganic Chemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Nakauchi-cho 5, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414, Japan

Publication date: April 1, 2008

  • Access Key
  • Free content
  • Partial Free content
  • New content
  • Open access content
  • Partial Open access content
  • Subscribed content
  • Partial Subscribed content
  • Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
Ingenta Connect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more