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Psychosocial mediators and moderators of the effect of peer-victimization upon depressive symptomatology

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Background: 

Intervention strategies and developmental models of stress have been criticized for failing to integrate social psychological variables. This study investigates both self-referential cognitive mediators (perceived threat and control) and a social psychological moderator (ethnic/religious identity) of the effect of peer-victimization upon depressive symptomatology. Methods: 

Self-report questionnaires were completed by 924 students (46% female), aged 8 to 12 years. Experiences of discriminatory and non-discriminatory peer-victimization, threat and control appraisals, depressive symptoms, and strength of main identity were assessed. Results: 

Perceived threat partially mediated the effect of peer-victimization (regardless of whether it was discriminatory or not) on depressive symptoms. Perceived control partially mediated the effect of non-discriminatory peer-victimization on depressive symptoms. Strength of ethnic/religious identity buffered the effect of peer-victimization on depressive symptoms. Victimization perceived to be discriminatory in nature was more strongly associated with depressive symptoms than non-discriminatory victimization. Conclusions: 

Findings support calls for a greater emphasis to be placed on social psychological variables in explaining depressive symptomatology. For clinical, counseling and intervention purposes, it is important to examine whether victims perceive peer-victimization as discriminatory and whether their own strength of identity affects symptomatology.
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Keywords: Appraisal; depression; discrimination; peer-victimization; social identity

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, UK 2: School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, UK 3: Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, UK 4: Department of Psychology, University of Cardiff, UK

Publication date: October 1, 2010

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