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Amyloid-β Inhibits PDGFβ Receptor Activation and Prevents PDGF-BB-induced Neuroprotection

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Background: PDGFβ receptors and their ligand, PDGF-BB, are upregulated in vivo after neuronal insults such as ischemia. When applied exogenously, PDGF-BB is neuroprotective against excitotoxicity and HIV proteins.

Objective: Given this growth factor's neuroprotective ability, we sought to determine if PDGF-BB would be neuroprotective against amyloid-β (1-42), one of the pathological agents associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Methods and Results: In both primary hippocampal neurons and the human-derived neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, amyloid-β treatment for 24 h decreased surviving cell number in a concentrationdependent manner. Pretreatment with PDGF-BB failed to provide any neuroprotection against amyloid-β in primary neurons and only very limited protective effects in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to its neuroprotective action, PDGF promotes cell growth and division in several systems, and the application of PDGFBB alone to serum-starved SH-SY5Y cells resulted in an increase in cell number. Amyloid-β attenuated the mitogenic effects of PDGF-BB, inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGFβ receptor phosphorylation, and attenuated the ability of PDGF-BB to protect neurons against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Despite the ability of amyloid-β to inhibit PDGFβ receptor activation, immunoprecipitation experiments failed to detect a physical interaction between amyloid-β and PDGF-BB or the PDGFβ receptor. However, G protein-coupled receptor transactivation of the PDGFβ receptor (an exclusively intracellular signaling pathway) remained unaffected by the presence of amyloid-β.

Conclusions: As the PDGF system is upregulated upon neuronal damage, the ability of amyloid-β to inhibit this endogenous neuroprotective system should be further investigated in the context of AD pathophysiology.
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Keywords: Alzheimer disease; Amyloid-β; PDGF-BB; PDGFβ receptor; growth factor; neuroprotection

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: June 1, 2018

This article was made available online on February 7, 2018 as a Fast Track article with title: "Amyloid-β Inhibits PDGFβ Receptor Activation and Prevents PDGF-BBInduced Neuroprotection".

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  • Current Alzheimer Research publishes peer-reviewed frontier review and research articles on all areas of Alzheimer's disease. This multidisciplinary journal will help in understanding the neurobiology, genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment strategies of Alzheimer's disease. The journal publishes objective reviews written by experts and leaders actively engaged in research using cellular, molecular, and animal models. The journal also covers original articles on recent research in fast emerging areas of molecular diagnostics, brain imaging, drug development and discovery, and clinical aspects of Alzheimer's disease. Manuscripts are encouraged that relate to the synergistic mechanism of Alzheimer's disease with other dementia and neurodegenerative disorders. Book reviews, meeting reports and letters-to-the-editor are also published. The journal is essential reading for researchers, educators and physicians with interest in age-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Current Alzheimer Research provides a comprehensive 'bird's-eye view' of the current state of Alzheimer's research for neuroscientists, clinicians, health science planners, granting, caregivers and families of this devastating disease.
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