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Surface Imprinted Sensor with Fluorescence Detection

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A technique combining surface imprinting with fluorescence detection is developed to detect trace amounts of analyte in a solution. Dipicolinic Acid (DPA) is selected as the test case to demonstrate the proof of concept and to parametrically assess the efficacy of the methodology. DPA, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, is a common chemical component of bacterial spores and is an important fluorescent marker for biodetection. The technique imprints the fluorescent analyte in a polysiloxane monolayer on an Indium Tin Oxide plate. When the sensor is dipped in the solution the analyte molecules are recognized and entrapped by the template cavities. Upon removal from the solution the fluorescence emission from the analyte serves to indicate the presence of the analyte and therefore a sensor capable of detecting trace amounts of analytes in solution is obtained. This fluorescence based surface imprinted sensor is found to be selective, specific, and sensitive, has high resolution and is very reproducible, with short response time and a long shelf life.
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Keywords: DIPICOLINIC ACID; FLUORESCENCE; IMPRINTING; SENSOR

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: September 1, 2015

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  • The growing interest and activity in the field of sensor technologies requires a forum for rapid dissemination of important results: Sensor Letters is that forum. Sensor Letters offers scientists, engineers and medical experts timely, peer-reviewed research on sensor science and technology of the highest quality. Sensor Letters publish original rapid communications, full papers and timely state-of-the-art reviews encompassing the fundamental and applied research on sensor science and technology in all fields of science, engineering, and medicine. Highest priority will be given to short communications reporting important new scientific and technological findings.
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