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Microleakage of Cements in Prefabricated Zirconia Crowns

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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare microleakage of prefabricated posterior NuSmile® ZR and EZCrowns when cemented with BioCem and Ketac Cem dental cements. Methods: Forty extracted permanent teeth (n equals 10 per group) were fitted for either NuSmile or EZCrowns prefabricated posterior zirconia crowns and cemented with BioCem or Ketac Cem, for a total of four groups. Crowned teeth were placed in Dulbecco's Phosphate Buffered Saline solution at 37 degrees Celsius for 24 hours. Teeth were thermocycled between five degrees Celsius and 55 degrees Celsius for 6,000 cycles, stained with two percent basic fuchsin, sectioned, and visually inspected for microleakage utilizing stereomicroscopy on a four-point scale. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, SNK (P<.05). Results: All samples in this study had microleakage. NuSmile® ZR crowns demonstrated significantly less microleakage when cemented with BioCem and compared to Ketac Cem (P=.002). NuSmile® ZR cemented with BioCem had significantly less microleakage compared to EZ-Crowns with Ketac Cem (P=.002). Conclusions: In this in vitro investigation, BioCem cement had significantly less microleakage in zirconia pre-fabricated crowns compared to Ketac Cem, and NuSmile® ZR crowns cemented with BioCem resulted in significantly less microleakage than EZ-Crowns cemented with Ketac Cem.
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Keywords: DENTAL CEMENTS; PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY; ZIRCONIUM

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Associate pediatric dentist in private practice, Seattle, Wash., USA 2: Senior research specialist, in the College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn., USA 3: Associate professor and director of Graduate Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Health, in the College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn., USA 4: Professor, in the College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn., USA 5: Professor and chair, Department of Bioscience Research, in the College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn., USA;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: March 1, 2018

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  • Pediatric Dentistry is the official publication of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry and the College of Diplomates of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. It is published bi-monthly and is internationally recognized as the leading journal in the area of pediatric dentistry. The journal promotes the practice, education and research specifically related to the specialty of pediatric dentistry. This peer-reviewed journal features scientific articles, case reports and abstracts of current pediatric dental research.
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