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The Impact of Dental Pain due to Caries in the Oral Health-Related Quality of Life of Children

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Purpose: To determine the extent to which history of dental pain explains the impact of dental caries on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among pre-schoolers.
Methods: A population-based study was conducted with a random sample of 769 five-year-old children. Preschoolers self-completed the Brazilian version of the Scale of Oral Health Outcomes for Five-Year-Old Children (SOHO-5), and caregivers completed a questionnaire addressing sociodemographic characteristics. Children had a dental/oral examination done by dentists. The effect of cavitated caries lesions on OHRQoL explained by pain was estimated by the percentage variation of the prevalence ratio (PR) for the impact of cavitated lesions on OHRQoL (PRc), and this measure was adjusted by dental pain (PRct). PR was determined through multiple Poisson regression (P <0.05).
Results: The prevalence of cavitated lesions was 58.8 percent; among this cohort, 23.8 percent reported dental pain. The PRc was 1.063 and PRct was 1.039. Thirty-eight percent of the impact of dental caries on OHRQoL was due to dental pain.
Conclusion: History of dental pain explains 38 percent of the impact of dental caries on the OHRQoL of preschoolers.

Keywords: CHILD; DENTAL CARIES; PAIN; PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY; PRESCHOOL CHILDREN; QUALITY OF LIFE

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: Dr. Gomes is a professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Medical Sciences, UniFACISA, Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 2: Dr. Perazzo is a Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil 3: Dr. Neves is a postdoctoral researcher, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil 4: Dr. Firmino is a professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Medical Sciences, UniFACISA, Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 5: Dr. Lopes is a graduate student, Department of Dentistry, State University of Para í ba, Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 6: Dr. Assunçã o is an assistant professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil 7: Dr. Ferreira is an associate professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil 8: Dr. Paiva is a professor and chair, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil 9: Dr. Granville-Garcia is an associate professor, both in the Department of Dentistry, State University of Para í ba, Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil;, Email: [email protected]

Publication date: May 1, 2021

More about this publication?
  • Acquired after the merger between the American Society of Dentistry for Children and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry in 2002, the Journal of Dentistry for Children (JDC) is an internationally renowned journal whose publishing dates back to 1934. Published three times a year, JDC promotes the practice, education and research specifically related to the specialty of pediatric dentistry. It covers a wide range of topics related to the clinical care of children, from clinical techniques of daily importance to the practitioner, to studies on child behavior and growth and development. JDC also provides information on the physical, psychological and emotional conditions of children as they relate to and affect their dental health.
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