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Open Access Effect of Silver Nanoparticles and Antibiotics on Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Anaerobic Digestion

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Abstract:

Water resource recovery facilities have been described as creating breeding ground conditions for the selection, transfer, and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) among various bacteria. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of direct addition of antibiotic and silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, or nanosilver) on the occurrence of ARGs in thermophilic anaerobic digesters. Test thermophilic digesters were amended with environmentally-relevant concentrations of Ag NP (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg-Ag/L; corresponding to ≈0.7, 7.0, and 70 mg-Ag/kg total solids) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) that span susceptible to resistant classifications (1, 5, and 50 mg/L) as potential selection pressures for ARGs. Tetracycline (tet(O), tet(W)) and sulfonamide (sulI, sulII) ARGs and the integrase enzyme gene (intI1) associated with Class 1 integrons were measured in raw sludge, test thermophilic digesters, a control thermophilic digester, and a control mesophilic digester. There was no apparent effect of Ag NPs on thermophilic anaerobic digester performance. The maximum SMX addition (50 mg/L) resulted in accumulation of volatile fatty acids and low pH, alkalinity, and volatile solids reduction. There was no significant difference between ARG gene copy numbers (absolute or normalized to 16S rRNA genes) in amended thermophilic digesters and the control thermophilic digester. Antibiotic resistance gene copy numbers in digested sludge ranged from 103 to 106 copies per μL (≈8 × 101 to 8 × 104 copies per μg) of sludge as result of a 1-log reduction of ARGs (2-log reduction for intI1). Quantities of the five ARGs in raw sludge ranged from 104 to 108 copies per μL (≈4 × 102 to 4 × 106 per μg) of sludge. Test and control thermophilic digesters (53 °C, 12-day solids retention time [SRT]) consistently reduced but did not eliminate levels of all analyzed genes. The mesophilic digester (37 °C, 20-day SRT) also reduced levels of sulI, sulII, and intI1 genes, but levels of tet(O) and tet(W) were the same or higher than in raw sludge. Antibiotic resistance gene reductions remained constant despite the application of selection pressures, which suggests that digester operating conditions are a strong governing factor of the bacterial community composition and thus the prevalence of ARGs.

Keywords: antibiotic; antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs); ionic silver; mesophilic anaerobic digestion; nanosilver; silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs); sulfamethoxazole (SMX); thermophilic anaerobic digestion

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: https://doi.org/10.2175/106143012X13373575831394

Publication date: 2013-05-01

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  • Water Environment Research (WER) is published monthly, including an annual Literature Review. A subscription to WER includes access to the latest content back to 1992, as well as access to fast track articles. An individual subscription is valid for 12 months from month of purchase.

    Water Environment Research� (WER�) publishes peer-reviewed research papers, research notes, state-of-the-art and critical reviews on original, fundamental and applied research in all scientific and technical areas related to water quality, pollution control, and management. An annual Literature Review provides a review of published books and articles on water quality topics from the previous year.

    Published as: Sewage Works Journal, 1928 - 1949; Sewage and Industrial Wastes, 1950 - 1959; Journal Water Pollution Control Federation, 1959 - Oct 1989; Research Journal Water Pollution Control Federation, Nov 1989 - 1991; Water Environment Research, 1992 - present.
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