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Pump Station Odor Control in a Tourist Location

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Abstract:

One of the most visited tourist destinations in Northern California is the historical district in downtown Monterey. In this area, the center of tourist activity is Cannery Row, a waterfront street that contains multiple high-end restaurants, hotels, tourist attractions, and the worldrenowned Monterey Bay Aquarium. The Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency's Reeside Pump Station is located at the south end of Cannery Row and on Monterey Bay. The pump station is adjacent to an upscale hotel, and a popular walking path traveled at all times by tourists and residents passes about 20 feet from the pump station. The pump station conveys wastewater from the Cannery Row commercial area and nearby residences into a large interceptor that eventually links with the Monterey Regional Treatment Plant.

Because of the high number of restaurants contributing to the pump station influent, grease accumulation is an issue, and the wet well must be pumped down once a week. During these “pump-downs”, odor emissions are a major concern. Furthermore, ongoing volatilization of hydrogen sulfide and organic reduced sulfur compounds is an issue within the pump station partially because of a 6-12 inch drop that the wastewater encounters at the end of the influent channel. These emissions routinely pass over the roofless pump station wall, impacting residents and tourists that use the nearby path and stop in that area to enjoy the bay views.

There are several limitations that require an innovative odor control approach. One is that chemical addition is not feasible at the pump station or upstream because of the resulting visual impacts. Gas-phase treatment of the foul air is desired, but there is limited available footprint for a new fan and odor control system, as the Agency cannot construct any new facilities outside of the pump station building, also because of visual impacts on the adjacent walking path, as well as to Cannery Row in general.

Brown and Caldwell is recommending installation of a dry adsorption system utilizing highhydrogen sulfide capacity carbon inside a vessel that would be located inside the pump station. To make room for this system, new covers will need to be installed and structural members of the building may need to be strengthened to accommodate the additional weight of the odor control system (projected to be approximately 2,000 pounds). A special exhaust stack will be constructed that releases odors as high as possible without being visible to tourists and residents that use the nearby path.

Keywords: Pump stations; carbon adsorption; footprint; hydrogen sulfide; tourists; visual impacts

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2175/193864710802768370

Publication date: January 1, 2010

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  • Proceedings of the Water Environment Federation is an archive of papers published in the proceedings of the annual Water Environment Federation® Technical Exhibition and Conference (WEFTEC® ) and specialty conferences held since the year 2000. These proceedings are not peer reviewed.

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